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Some of the letters of complaint, from persons who have worked directly with past victims, have pointed out that some of my comments were also traumatic for them.

I very much regret that as well." Alberta Chief Justice Neil Wittmann, who reviewed the complaints against Dewar, said Dewar's comments "showed a clear lack of sensitivity towards victims of sexual assault" but do not merit his removal from the bench.

Rhodes was sentenced to three years in prison in 2013.

Although the organizers expected around 200 people to show up, over 3,000 gathered at Queen's Park.

Dewar rejected his defence but said aspects of it could be considered in sentencing.

"In fact, this is completely contradictory to what officers are taught," she said.

"They are taught that nothing a woman does contributes to a sexual assault." Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair also spoke on the matter: "If that type of, frankly, archaic thinking still exists among any of my officers, it highlights for me the need to continue to train my officers and sensitize them to the reality of victimization." Sanguinetti's statement, according to Blair, is meant to "place the blame upon victims, and that's not where the blame should ever be placed." Rosemary Gartner, a University of Toronto criminologist, said linking style of dress to sexual assault is "ridiculous." "If that were the case, there would be no rapes of women who wear veils and we know there are rapes in those countries," she said.

According to the judicial council, Dewar has met with a "gender equality" expert and is "pursuing further professional development in this area as part of his commitment to become a better judge." The Manitoba Court of Appeal later overturned Rhodes' conviction and ordered a new trial be set.

The appeal court ruled Dewar did not properly assess the credibility of the accused and the alleged victim in reaching his verdict.

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